Technology Center

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Brooklyn Youth Enhancement believes that attracting young people to STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics) is the key to closing the achievement gap and eradicating the disparity in academic performance between disadvantaged and privileged students. To break the poverty cycle in low-income communities, BYE equips these students with the tools needed to learn about STEM disciplines at an early age.

 

BYE’s access programs provide extended learning opportunities to supplement and enhance in-school learning. The U.S. has lagged behind other countries in terms of global competitiveness in recent years; our competitiveness will only improve if we start molding the next generation of innovators at a young age. Determined to increase the number of low-income students with STEM proficiency leading to future engagement in STEM fields, BYE...
 

  • exposes low-income youth to supplemental education so that underserved students in Brooklyn improve their chances to compete as STEM professionals,

  • engages and intellectually challenges students to be innovative, analytical thinkers and problem solvers,

  • creates an environment where STEM fundamentals are not just read in a textbook, but instead, made applicable to real-world scenarios,

  • nurtures students’ innate curiosity to learn and explore,

  • showcases the vast opportunities available in all facets of STEM.
     

Financial support would enable BYE to expand access for more youth and enhance program quality. What outcomes BYE hopes to achieve: We seek to continue to meet the following objectives but do this on a larger scale because the problem of too few STEM-enabled low-income youth and citizenry is urgent.

 

Children will learn STEM disciplines in a trans-disciplinary, intensive and applied but yet fun fashion, over the participation lifecycle (from kindergarten to 5th grade). We anticipate that we will expose 100% of the youth to a level of rigor that will inspire an interest in STEM fields while enhancing their capacity for academic achievement.